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Tag Archives: socrates

Plato’s Phaedo: The Spirituality of Socrates

“Crito, we ought to offer a cock to Asclepius. See to it, and don’t forget.” – the Last words of Socrates, according to Plato. Reading Socrates’ final utterance, one could be forgiven of thinking he was a practical, material man. Nothing, however, could be further from the truth. Socrates, as depicted in Plato’s Phaedo, was

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Socrates Justice – Law and Disorder

by Anya Leonard Somewhere between the words of Socrates and the thoughts of Plato lies the profound question of what is ‘Just’. Is it defined by laws and men or is it something separate, something ideal? When one is wrongfully imprisoned, for example, is it okay to escape, to break the “law” as it is

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The Death of Socrates…and the State that Killed Him

by Anya Leonard According to the Oracle at Delphi, Socrates was the wisest of them all. It is usually considered unwise, however, to publicly attack the political class and humiliate their intellect, capability and righteousness. This is particularly true when the government is in a weakened and, therefore, volatile position. Why then would Socrates, nobel

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Isocrates: The Essayist

By Ben Potter In many ways Isocrates is the forgotten man of Classical Greece. As a product of Athens’ Golden Age, he was a contemporary of Plato, Euripides, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Aristotle, et al,… just without their fame or everlasting glory. And it’s not that he didn’t deserve it. Indeed, a case can be made that

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Deterministically Indeterminate

“Marx was right!”, declares Bill Bonner’s Diary of a Rogue Economist. “Oh yeah?”, I wonder to myself. You certainly know how to write a good hook there, Mr. Bonner. Please, go on. What was Marx right about? Strangely, the first thing that comes to mind is a quote that I either read, heard, or made

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The Pitiable Tyrant

Do you remember a few weeks ago when we had a bit of a discussion on the Platonic dialogue, Gorgias? I sure do. Those were good times, simpler times. Most of you are dedicated readers so I won’t have to remind you that we discussed the nature of rhetoric, the morality of rhetoric, and Socrates’

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