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Tag Archives: Xerxes

The Warring Writer: Aeschylus Tragedy

Let’s say you are considered the “father of tragedy”. Even in your own lifetime, everyone knows you have revolutionized drama and changed the theatre game. Do you think it would be mentioned on your tomb? Surely a throw away reference at least? But no, not for Aeschylus. The man who wrote between 70 and 90

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Political Scandals Of Ancient Greece

1. Artemisia of Caria destroys one of her own ships Artemisia, portrayed a tad bit incorrectly by Eva Green in the recent 300 film, was a queen and military commander from the Ionian Kingdom of Caria. An ally to the massive Persian Empire of the early 5th century, Artemisia was a trusted advisor to King

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My Women Fight Like Men

Queen Artemisia of Caria is mentioned by a handful of ancient Greek writers who would have lived some years after her death. Most of our knowledge about her, of course, comes from the Father of History himself. Herodotus directly makes reference to Artemisia numerous times as he recounts the events of the Greco-Persian wars. As

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The Rise of Themistocles (Part 3)

Click the links to read “The Rise of Themistocles” part 1 and part 2  By 480 BCE, the  Athenian general and statesman, Themistocles, had eliminated his political opponents and had been squarely planted as the most influential man in Athens. Rising through the political ranks of a young democratic city, Themistocles had taken great strides

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Thermopylae: Battle in the Shade

The year was 480 BC and the Battle of Thermopylae was about to commence. King Leonidas I was dispatched from Sparta with only his royal bodyguard of 300 men to help him stop the oncoming Persian invasion, led by Xerxes I. Fortunately Leonidas was not entirely alone. He was able to procure more soldiers: an

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