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About: Monica Correa

Monica is a History teacher and freelance Journalist based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She knows about Latin American history but likes to flirt Greek and Roman too. Her life motto: Credo quia absurdum

Recent Posts by Monica Correa

Roman Chariot Racing: a Sport for Fanatics

By Mónica Correa, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Nowadays folks use fast cars and designer handbags to flaunt their wealth. Back in the ancient Greek world, however, owning horses was the ultimate status symbol. This tradition continued during the Roman Empire and indeed, anyone who partook in equine activities was immediately assumed to belong to the

The Colosseum: A Symbol of Gory Glory

By Mónica Correa, contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom While the Roman Empire bequeathed us many splendid structures, from the Pantheon in Italy to the Maison Carrée in France, there is one architectural wonder that is no doubt, the most famous of all Roman creations. The Colosseum, with its architecture, detailed structural elements and impressive history, manages

Ptolemy, the Man who Reached the Stars

By Mónica Correa, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The study of the earth, stars and space started millennia ago. With a lot of observation and subsequent writings, men such as Ptolemy built the foundations of our understanding of the universe that surrounds us. Today we know that his name was, in fact, Klaudios Ptolemaios. He probably

The Oracle of Delphi: More than a legend

By Mónica Correa, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Centuries ago, from every corner of the Mediterranean, people traveled to Greece to get answers about their life and future by the Oracle of Delphi. It was there that the god Apollo, through different women named Pythia chosen by local priests, sent his messages to those who needed

The rise and fall of the Delian League

By Mónica Correa, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Delian League, or Confederacy of Delos, was the name used for the confederation of Greek states under the ‘leadership’ of Athens. According to some records, it lasted from the end of the Persian War, circa 478 BC, until the end of the Peloponnesian War in the year

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