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Tag Archives: Alexandria

The Eternal City

Written by Brendan Heard, Author of the Decline and Fall of Western Art The Ptolemaic Dynasty of Egypt is a unique reference point in classical history. Most notably, our very notion of classical wisdom itself largely depends on this period, insofar as it played a role in  the documentation, preservation, and accumulation of the wisdom

The 13 Most Important Buildings in Ancient Alexandria, Egypt

An important center of Hellenistic civilization, Alexandria was the capital of Ptolemaic Egypt, Roman and Byzantine Egypt for almost 1,000 years. The city was founded around c. 332 BC by the Macedonian King, Alexander the Great, during his conquest of the Achaemenid Empire. At one point, Alexandria became the largest city in the world and, for

Ancient Alexandria, Egypt

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Egyptian city of Alexandria was established in 331 BCE by its Eponymous founder, Alexander the Great. Despite its humble beginnings as a port city, Alexandria developed into one of the most prosperous metropolitan areas in the ancient world. It grew to boast such wonders like the library

Hypatia-The Last Academic (Part Two)

By Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Read Hypatia-The Last Academic (part One) here. Under Christian rule, Alexandria, once the definitive center of learning throughout the empire, was fast becoming anti-intellectual and inhospitable to Hypatia and the academic circle in which she traveled. In fact, this burgeoning new religion was oftentimes suspicious of learning, equating

Hypatia: The Last Academic – Part One

By Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom They came to her by land. They came to her by sea. They came to her from the farthest reaches of the Roman Empire and they came to her from close by. Amongst the literati, Hypatia (355-415 CE), acclaimed philosopher and leading mathematician, was a rock star. She

Euclid: The Father of Geometry

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom We all know the varsity team: Einstein, Newton, Pythagoras, Descartes. These names are drilled into our heads all through grade school math and history classes, and possibly accompanied by an under-the-breath curse from a disgruntled calculus or physics student. However, another mathematician should receive our attention: Euclid of