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Tag Archives: History

A Short History of Wine

Written by Lydia Serrant, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom What is believed to be the first winery in the world was recently found in a cave in Vayots Dzor, Armenia, and dates back to around 6100 BC. It currently holds the title as the oldest-known winery (also, fun fact, it is home of the world’s oldest

Should We Learn “Outdated” History?

It seems like most holidays start with a bit of throat clearing nowadays… Followed by a few caveats… and the inevitable, “well… actually…”. I’m acutely aware of this because I’m regularly tasked with the job of explaining American holidays and their corresponding customs both to my five year old and local friends down here in

Tarquin, Last King of Rome and Bloody Tyrant

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Roman Republic was moulded rather decisively by the fall of the monarchy. The Republic was designed to prevent the re-emergence of rule by a single person. Rome’s last monarch was Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (died 495 BC). His tyranny provoked a rebellion, and this was to lead

Greece Versus Rome: Polybius Decides

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It is the eternal question for all classics enthusiasts: brawn versus brains, power versus beauty, empire versus empiricism – Rome versus Greece. Which team do you support? Of course the equation is far, far more complex than that. Indeed, most of the choices listed above are somewhere on

Can History Incite HATE? Should it be Censored?

***The Dialectics is an exciting new section of Classical Wisdom. Taken from our weekly newsletters, it delves into the discourses our Classical Wisdom community is having about ancient and modern topics. The idea is to use our knowledge of the ancient world, as well as the logical and philosophical methods at our disposal to investigate

The Birth of the Biography

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom What springs to mind when we think about literature of the Ancient World? Maybe it’s Homer’s Achilles dragging the corpse of Hector around Troy or Sophocles’ Oedipus stabbing out his polluted eyes. Perhaps it’s Plato’s Socrates holding forth or Herodotus’ Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. It even might