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Tag Archives: Julius Caesar

Date and Time in Ancient Rome

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Time. It’s an abstract concept, but it frames our life possibly more than anything else. We cannot touch time, we cannot feel it or see it, but we know for sure that, as the years pass, we will have (more) grey hair and a lot more stories

Cicero: Rome’s Greatest Defender

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom There are many great Romans whose names are still honored to this day. None has been more feted down the centuries than Cicero. He was perhaps Rome’s greatest author and one of its greatest orators and philosophers. Cicero was also one the last defenders of the Roman

Man: The Political Animal

Written by David Hooker, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Tragic Road to Tyranny  Imagine your leader is a brilliant and bold military genius who, through multiple conquests, has expanded the borders of your country by orders of magnitude.  He does it because he and some of your leaders have ambitions of empire, need of new

Brutus: Traitor or Patriot?

Et tu, Brute? Whether or not Caesar once uttered those dramatic words, he probably did think it. After all, it was a literal backstabbing moment; Brutus was Caesar’s friend and protege. Of all the 23 knives that plunged into his flesh, that one would have hurt the most. But Shakespeare’s famous line about the ancient

5 Women Who Changed Antiquity

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It’s no secret that women are vastly underrepresented in the historical record. Biographical information, even about some of the most prominent women like Cleopatra, is often gleamed from tangential accounts focused on male counterparts. Of course this doesn’t mean that women did not making massive contributions to arts,

The Birth of the Biography

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom What springs to mind when we think about literature of the Ancient World? Maybe it’s Homer’s Achilles dragging the corpse of Hector around Troy or Sophocles’ Oedipus stabbing out his polluted eyes. Perhaps it’s Plato’s Socrates holding forth or Herodotus’ Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. It even might