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Tag Archives: Nero

Petronius – one of the first novelists and a victim of Nero

Written by Ed Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Petronius was one of the world’s first novelists and an important cultural figure in his day. He was influential in the Rome of Nero, but this would ultimately lead to his death. Biography of Petronius The chief source for the life of this fascinating character is the

Locusta the Poisoner: Ancient Rome’s First Female Serial Killer

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ancient Rome was a brutal place where life was cheap. Romans accepted violence and oppression as part of everyday life, evidenced by their terrible treatment of slaves. However, in the first century AD, even they were appalled by the murders and practices of a woman known as

What Newly-Found 2,000-Year-Old Celtic Coins Tell Us About Boudica

Written by Tom G. Hamilton, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom As of this writing, news of the largest hoard of early Roman-era Celtic gold coins ever found— unearthed by a bird-watcher in Britain—are making headlines. The coins are reported to be Boudica-era gold “stater” Iceni coins. There is an understandable excitement all across the land, the

Broken Down by Force: On Seneca and the Power of His Word

Written by Mariami Shanshashvili, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Not many historical events in the annals of our civilization are so universally well-known that they need no introduction. The death of Socrates is one such momentous event. An unfading scene firmly entrenched in all our minds; for most of us, dictated by the iconic painting of Jacques-Louis

The Golden Rule

By Ben Potter All that glitters may not be gold, but that hasn’t stopped the shiny yellow stuff from being relentlessly pursued throughout mankind’s civilized existence. Twinkling goodness aside, gold has the virtue of being malleable, ductile, resistant to tarnishing, abundant, easily extracted and, above all else, useless! Well, perhaps not totally, but it is

Saturnalia: The Party don’t Stop

by Anya Leonard Catullus (XIV) describes it as “the best of days.” Seneca complains that the “whole mob has let itself go in pleasures” (Epistles, XVIII.3). Pliny the Younger writes that he retired to his room while the rest of the household celebrated (Epistles, II.17.24). It was a time when people rejoiced, visited friends, gave