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Tag Archives: Rome

Eunapius: Historian, Teacher and Fearless Pagan

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom There are many remarkable figures in the history of Greece. Too often, the focus is on the Golden Ages of Greece and Rome. However, even in Late Antiquity when the Graeco-Roman world was in decline, there were many significant figures—Eunapius among them. This famous Greek sophist, historian,

Roman Pantheon: A Gigantic Sundial?

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Romans were great builders and are still revered as great engineers. One of the greatest buildings they constructed was the Pantheon. A new theory argues that the building was designed to act as a sundial during the Spring Equinox, which falls between March 19 and 21.

Greece or Rome: Which was more Influential?

Anyone who knows me, knows I like to stir the proverbial pot. (While anyone who watched this weekend’s webinar knows I completely forgot about the actual pot…on the stove). It’s for this very reason I so enjoy our Monday (sometimes Tuesday) mailbags. I love to grow a good debate, birth a lively discussion, or stoke

Hunting Dogs in the Ancient World

Written by Robert Gate, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom For millennia, dogs and people have shared a close partnership. No one is still ready to claim when and where the first dog was domesticated, but it is generally accepted that it was for hunting. Thousands of years ago, men did not have big guns to aid

The Colosseum: A Symbol of Gory Glory

By Mónica Correa, contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom While the Roman Empire bequeathed us many splendid structures, from the Pantheon in Italy to the Maison Carrée in France, there is one architectural wonder that is no doubt, the most famous of all Roman creations. The Colosseum, with its architecture, detailed structural elements and impressive history, manages

Caesar’s Gaul

By Benjamin Welton When it comes to Julius Caesar’s accounts of the Gallic wars, it’s clear to see that propaganda was his chief concern. Of course, he claims to have recorded his conquest for the purposes of posterity, namely that his notes would be the source material for a later, more qualified Roman historian. But