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Tag Archives: Rome

Ten Caesars

by Sean Kelly, Managing Editor, Classical Wisdom You know the names… …but do you know the men behind them? There are few, if any, names more consequential in the ancient world than Caesar. Centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, the name Caesar still means one thing: leader. As late as the twentieth century,

What Makes a Republic? The Evolution of a Political System.

By Ed Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In the contemporary world, republics are the most common form of government, yet few of us take the time to consider what a republic actually is. If we want to more deeply understand the nature of republics, we need to look back to the ancient examples of Rome,

Eunapius: Historian, Teacher and Fearless Pagan

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom There are many remarkable figures in the history of Greece. Too often, the focus is on the Golden Ages of Greece and Rome. However, even in Late Antiquity when the Graeco-Roman world was in decline, there were many significant figures—Eunapius among them. This famous Greek sophist, historian,

Roman Pantheon: A Gigantic Sundial?

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Romans were great builders and are still revered as great engineers. One of the greatest buildings they constructed was the Pantheon. A new theory argues that the building was designed to act as a sundial during the Spring Equinox, which falls between March 19 and 21.

Greece or Rome: Which was more Influential?

Anyone who knows me, knows I like to stir the proverbial pot. (While anyone who watched this weekend’s webinar knows I completely forgot about the actual pot…on the stove). It’s for this very reason I so enjoy our Monday (sometimes Tuesday) mailbags. I love to grow a good debate, birth a lively discussion, or stoke

Hunting Dogs in the Ancient World

Written by Robert Gate, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom For millennia, dogs and people have shared a close partnership. No one is still ready to claim when and where the first dog was domesticated, but it is generally accepted that it was for hunting. Thousands of years ago, men did not have big guns to aid