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Tag Archives: Seneca

The Mandalorian Way and Stoicism

Written by Adam Piercey, Co-Founder of Modern StoicismToronto  The image of a lone warrior walking a barren wasteland is a captivating sight. Made popular by movies, television, and graphic arts, the single fighter following a path unyieldingly will always incite a sense of excitement in its viewers. Following an ancient practice, upholding the highest laws,

Three New Year’s Resolutions from Epicurus

Written By Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom Resolutions are notoriously difficult to keep. It’s why we joke and tease about the fact that gyms tend to be packed in the beginning of January but return to normal by February. Whatever motivation there was seems to fade, and the resolution with it. But just because

Three Stoic Lessons from a Galaxy Far, Far Away

By Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom Weekly It is no secret, to those who are familiar with the saga, that Star Wars is filled with wisdom. Those not familiar with Star Wars are at least familiar with its iconography, such as the helmet of Darth Vader—that great symbol of the dark side of the

How to Be a Citizen of the World

Written by Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom The term ‘cosmopolitan’ is derived from the Greek kosmou politês, which roughly translates to ‘world citizen.’  The notion of what it means to be a cosmopolitan was probably best expressed in a response often attributed to Diogenes the Cynic who, when asked where he came from, responded,

Four Common(ly misunderstood) Latin Proverbs

The other day a student told me that, during her studies as an art student, she had to sculpt a small statue as an assignment for one of her courses. She did so without having put much thought into it. The professor approached her and started praising her work, giving it much more and much

Christianity and Stoicism

By Rodrigo Ferreyra, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It is no secret that the origins of Christian thought are closely related to other Mediterranean philosophies and religions. Already determined by its Jewish heritage, Christianity additionally borrowed for itself different elements such as the Golden Age myth, the fatalism of living in a fallen world, and Zoroastrian