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Tag Archives: Stoic Philosophy

The False Promise of Stoicism

Written by Aaron Smith, Instructor and Fellow, Ayn Rand Institute [The Ayn Rand Institute has granted permission to Classical Wisdom Weekly to republish this article in its entirety, originally published in New Ideal, but does not necessarily endorse the images accompanying it or other content on this site.] Over the past decade, the ancient Greek

How Stoicism Cured My Depression

Written by Pete Lewis, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Long ago and far away, laws of physics sent an asteroid hurtling through space. It collided with a planet in its equally predetermined orbit. That is how the theory goes. Neither the asteroid nor the planet is at fault for wiping out the dinosaurs. It was a

The Mandalorian Way and Stoicism

Written by Adam Piercey, Co-Founder of Modern StoicismToronto  The image of a lone warrior walking a barren wasteland is a captivating sight. Made popular by movies, television, and graphic arts, the single fighter following a path unyieldingly will always incite a sense of excitement in its viewers. Following an ancient practice, upholding the highest laws,

Three Stoic Lessons from a Galaxy Far, Far Away

By Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom Weekly It is no secret, to those who are familiar with the saga, that Star Wars is filled with wisdom. Those not familiar with Star Wars are at least familiar with its iconography, such as the helmet of Darth Vader—that great symbol of the dark side of the

Epictetus: Philosophy as a Guide to Life

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Stoicism was one of the most popular and influential schools of philosophy in the Ancient World. Indeed, it is still popular to this day and is studied in Universities. One of the greatest of all Stoic philosophers was Epictetus (55-135 AD), a man who, despite being subjected

Having a Healthy Debate: Three Tips from Marcus Aurelius

Written by Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom As a Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius faced many instances of adversity, not only from the Germanic tribes to the north, but from his generals and members of the Roman Senate as well. So it is no surprise to find in his Meditations various reflections on how a rational