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Tag Archives: Stoic

The Life of Marcus Aurelius: Part III

Written by Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Parthian Attacks With barely enough time to get comfortable in the Emperor’s seat, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus’ minds were turned to a ghost that haunted their predecessor. As Emperor Antoninus Pius lay dying, his mind was often consumed by the actions of foreign kings. Such worries

How Stoicism Cured My Depression

Written by Pete Lewis, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Long ago and far away, laws of physics sent an asteroid hurtling through space. It collided with a planet in its equally predetermined orbit. That is how the theory goes. Neither the asteroid nor the planet is at fault for wiping out the dinosaurs. It was a

Epictetus: Philosophy as a Guide to Life

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Stoicism was one of the most popular and influential schools of philosophy in the Ancient World. Indeed, it is still popular to this day and is studied in Universities. One of the greatest of all Stoic philosophers was Epictetus (55-135 AD), a man who, despite being subjected

How to Be a Citizen of the World

Written by Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom The term ‘cosmopolitan’ is derived from the Greek kosmou politês, which roughly translates to ‘world citizen.’  The notion of what it means to be a cosmopolitan was probably best expressed in a response often attributed to Diogenes the Cynic who, when asked where he came from, responded,

Chrysippus the Under-Rated

By Jacob Bell, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom “If Chrysippus had not existed, neither would the Stoa.” This became a popular catchphrase of the Stoics. The Stoics viewed Chrysippus as a central figure in helping to establish the core doctrines and principles of Stoicism. Chrysippus is often hailed as the “second founder of Stoicism.” The Stoics

Epictetus, the Stoic-Slave

By Jacob Bell, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom Epictetus was a Stoic philosopher that lived from 55-135 CE. He came before Marcus Aurelius and after Seneca. Epictetus was a slave for much of his youth and began studying philosophy under Musonius Rufus during his enslavement. He gained his freedom sometime after the death of Emperor Nero