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About: Whelan

Edward Whelan attended the University of Maynooth 2003-2008 and studied history and classical studies. He obtained a BA from Maynooth and was admitted to the History Ph.D. program. He graduated with a PhD in history in 2008. Between 2010-2012 he worked in the Limerick City Archives. A published author he has also written many journal articles. Edward is a full-time freelance writer and researcher and live in, County Clare, Ireland.

Recent Posts by Whelan

Ancient Agora

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The ancient Agora of Athens is one of the most influential archaeological sites and says a lot about the life of the Greeks. ‘Agora’ literally meaning ‘a place of gathering.’ It was a marketplace where every Athenian citizen participated in governance, overlooked judicial matters, traded commodities, exchanged

Plato’s Symposium: Love and Philosophy

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Plato is regarded by many as the world’s greatest philosopher. In his dialogues, he examined everything from the nature of reality, to ethics, to beauty, to the state. The Symposium, which you can read in full here, is the summation of Plato’s ideas on love, and have proven very influential.

Tarquin, Last King of Rome and Bloody Tyrant

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Roman Republic was moulded rather decisively by the fall of the monarchy. The Republic was designed to prevent the re-emergence of rule by a single person. Rome’s last monarch was Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (died 495 BC). His tyranny provoked a rebellion, and this was to lead

Lycurgus: Mysterious Spartan Lawgiver

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Sparta has fascinated people for thousands of years. One of the most, if not the most important figure in all of Spartan history was Lycurgus, the great lawgiver. The interesting thing is that we know very little about this man and his character and indeed, many suspect

The Age of Homer, or the Dark Ages (12th-9th century)

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom We often regard the Greeks as the epitome of Civilizations. However, before the great achievement of the Fifth Century BC in Athens and elsewhere, they underwent a period of decline and dislocation. For over three centuries Greece endured a Dark Age when cities were abandoned and society

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