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Tag Archives: Homer

12 Ancient Greek Terms that Should Totally Make a Comeback

Learning Ancient Greek can be… challenging. For one thing, there are competing dialects (as was discussed in our Podcasts with Professors Episode with the Professor of Linguistics at the University of Cyprus.) As such, there are times when we aren’t even sure how the word is pronounced. There are also like 5 different translations for

Xenia for a Better World

Today’s Classics Challenge delves into the importance of Xenia… and how resurfacing this concept can make for both better individuals and society as a whole. But first… What is Xenia? Watch the video below to learn of this critical part of Ancient Greek (and indeed modern Greek) culture: While this was an essential part of

Hesiod, a Poet of Agriculture and Peace

By Eldar Balta, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Long before Herodotus fathered History and did his best to chronicle the past deeds of humankind, the true recorders of men and Gods were the ancient Greek poets, one of which was Hesiod. Even though the exact time of his life is unknown, Herodotus’ estimation puts him (as

Thucydides Vs Herodotus: Which Historian Wins?

By Ben Potter There has been a great deal of focus on the differences between Herodotus and Thucydides. Both men have been granted the ‘father of history’ accolade, but chronologically Herodotus must be the winner of the distinction as Thucydides picks up where he leaves off. For those in need of a quick recap, Herodotus

The Realm of Poseidon: A Mythical Voyage Around the Aegean

By Peter Marshall, Contributing Writer, Ancient Origins “Poseidon the great god I begin to sing, he who moves the earth and the desolate sea… You are dark-haired you are blessed you have a kind heart. Help those who sail upon The sea In ships.” ~Homeric Hymn to Poseidon Gods and Legends Poseidon was the Greek

Of Ancient Bondage

By Ben Potter “Jove takes half the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him”. Homer was quick to recognize the terror and inhumanity of slavery. And he used it as a powerful tool to stoke the drama of his epic: “tears will break forth anew for he who would have