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About: Jocelyn Hitchcock

Jocelyn currently lives in Greece and is a MA student in Greek and Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, with a BA in Classics and History from UNC Chapel Hill. Her current work focuses on network theory and economic development in the central Mediterranean Bronze Age. She enjoys Latin comedy, modern entertainment reception of epics, and any reason to buy a new notebook for research.

Recent Posts by Jocelyn Hitchcock

Calliope: Muse of Eloquence

Written by Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “Sing, O Muse, of the man of many devices…” Line one of the Odyssey begins like so many in ancient literature, by invoking the muses or gods. It was a common practice to ask, thank, and implore the other-worldly forces for inspiration and guidance in writing and

From God of the Sea to Maserati: The Legacy of Poseidon

Poseidon, the notorious Greek god of the sea (though he was also god of earthquakes, storms, and horses) has been held in high esteem over the millennia. The Romans recast him as the god Neptune, retaining his dominion over the sea. In Bologna, Italy, during the 16th century, the Fountain of Neptune was erected, becoming

5 Women Who Changed Antiquity

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It’s no secret that women are vastly underrepresented in the historical record. Biographical information, even about some of the most prominent women like Cleopatra, is often gleamed from tangential accounts focused on male counterparts. Of course this doesn’t mean that women did not making massive contributions to arts,

Aristophanes’ The Frogs: A Way to Stop a War?

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Frogs, an ‘old’ comedy play by Aristophanes, was performed in 405 BCE at the Lenaia festival of Dionysus. With the Peloponnesian War raging on, plays of the time had a tendency to deal with saving the state, matters of right and wrong, and background events of the

A Tale of Two Theaters: Greek and Roman Theaters

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Greek and Roman theaters regularly rank among the most popular archaeological sites to visit. Their sheer size and state of preservation make it easy for visitors to gauge the scale of events in antiquity and to feel as if they can travel back in time; an experience that

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