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About: Jocelyn Hitchcock

Jocelyn currently lives in Greece and is a MA student in Greek and Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, with a BA in Classics and History from UNC Chapel Hill. Her current work focuses on network theory and economic development in the central Mediterranean Bronze Age. She enjoys Latin comedy, modern entertainment reception of epics, and any reason to buy a new notebook for research.

Recent Posts by Jocelyn Hitchcock

A Tale of Two Theaters: Greek and Roman Theaters

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Greek and Roman theaters regularly rank among the most popular archaeological sites to visit. Their sheer size and state of preservation make it easy for visitors to gauge the scale of events in antiquity and to feel as if they can travel back in time; an experience that

Mummy Mia: the Fayum Mummy Portraits

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom A mummy, a vampire, and Frankenstein’s Monster walk into a bar… and order a classic Hollywood horror trope. Throughout the years, mummies have been cinematic vehicles for fear, leading to a widely held belief that Egyptian mummies were inherently spooky themselves. Immediately, we picture stiffly postured, white, tattered

The Pompeii Mosaics: A Rare Look into Roman Life

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Pompeii Mosaics: The Volcano Erupts For nearly 2000 years Pompeii and its destruction has captivated the minds of historians, archaeologists, and tourists alike. Although lost beneath rubble until rediscovered in 1748, writings from Pliny the Younger clued us in to a massive volcanic eruption that shook the

The Sirens: A Symbol of Fear

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “For with their high clear song, the Sirens bewitch him, as they sit there in a meadow piled high with the moldering skeletons of men, whose withered skin still hangs upon their bones.” Odyssey. 12: 39-54 The elusive Sirens of the Aegean have been cornerstone characters in Greek

Anaxagoras and His Mind

By Monica Correa, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In ancient Greece, the idea of a flat earth was simply assumed to be true. There were a select few that doubted this notion, and with their doubt came an ideological and theoretical struggle to sustain various points of view on the matter. This created a rich environment

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