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Tag Archives: Alexander the Great

Alcoholism in the Greco-Roman World

By Dale Vernor, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Binge drinking is nothing new. Gilgamesh, the semi-mythic Mesopotamian king who lived around 2,800 BC, is reported to have promised his workers “(a river of) ale, beer, and wine”,… which doesn’t exactly suggest moderation. Indeed, most practices, beliefs, and attitudes linked to alcohol use date back to the

Caesar and Alexander: The Story of Two Leaders

By Giuseppe Aiello, contributing writer, Classical Wisdom It is the year 69 before Christ. Gaius Julius Caesar, now more than thirty, is located in Cadiz, the ancient Gades of Punic origin. Here, one step away from the famous Gates, where the Mediterranean flows into the ocean, the Roman wanders around the temple dedicated to Hercules,

Aristotle The Philosopher who Knew it All

It has been said that he was a man who knew everything. In fact, he was considered the last man who did know everything. Was he born with a supernatural Rainman-like memory? Did the Gods imbue him with the divine gift of wisdom? Maybe, but probably not. In all likelihood, he did know everything of

Isocrates: The Essayist

By Ben Potter In many ways Isocrates is the forgotten man of Classical Greece. As a product of Athens’ Golden Age, he was a contemporary of Plato, Euripides, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Aristotle, et al,… just without their fame or everlasting glory. And it’s not that he didn’t deserve it. Indeed, a case can be made that

The Poet King and his ‘Kingdom’

By Abigail Russell Alexander’s brief and militant kingship won the renown of the ages and awarded him the title ‘Great.’ He is revered among the greatest military geniuses in history and with good reason! Bringing the mighty Persian Empire to its ruin, decreeing himself Pharaoh of Egypt, and spreading Greek culture as far east as

Flawless Beauty or the Beauty of Flaws

By Anya Leonard “CRACK! Smash!” The sound of your favorite vase hitting the floor. You search around for the culprit – a child, a dog, or a clumsy spouse, any of which is about to incur your wrath. Perhaps it was an earthquake, and Poseidon is to blame… But what if, instead of looking at