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Tag Archives: Hesiod

Why do we NEED literature?

It’s been a big weekend, dear reader… We travelled to Mexico City to see old friends, we solemnly remembered the fourth anniversary of the deadly earthquake we barely avoided by bizarrely missing a flight, and we celebrated the launch of my dear husband’s first novel.  It was certainly a rollercoaster of emotions!  While the other

Hesiod and Anaximander In Comparison

Written by Nicholaos Jones, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ancient Greek philosophy begins in Miletus, an illustrious Greek colony along the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea. Before the Milesian philosophers, however, there were the mythic poets. The history of ancient Greek philosophy is, in some sense, a history of breaking with the strategy these poets

Aristophanes: Utopia and Human Nature

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ever since there were people and places, there has been a desire for other, different people, and ideal, perfect places. This concept is called utopia, a word that has its origin in ancient Greek, as a compound of the word οὐ (ou, ”not”) and τόπος (topos, ”place”).

Circe: Justice for the Witch

By Katherine Smyth, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom If you think you know the story of Circe, the witch of Aeaea and the seducer of the hero Odysseus, think again. There’s more to her story than is widely publicized or acknowledged, but to understand how Circe became one of ancient Greek mythology’s most notorious women you

Titans of Greek Mythology

Okay, today we are talking about the Titans of Greek mythology. Now, of course there are a lot of sources when it comes to discussing ancient Greek mythology, but we are going to use Hesiod’s Theogony, which is sort of like the Bible of the ancient Greek world. So first, what is a Titan? Titans

Hesiod, a Poet of Agriculture and Peace

By Eldar Balta, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Long before Herodotus fathered History and did his best to chronicle the past deeds of humankind, the true recorders of men and Gods were the ancient Greek poets, one of which was Hesiod. Even though the exact time of his life is unknown, Herodotus’ estimation puts him (as