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About: Mary Naples

With an emphasis in Women’s Studies, Mary Naples has an M.A. in Humanities from Dominican University of California. Her deep love of the classical world is reflected in her writing which explores women’s narratives ranging from the ancient Greek and Roman worlds into the Byzantine era and even into ancient Israel and Judea. Mary Naples has been a contributing writer for Classical Wisdom since 2013. More of her articles can be found at www.femminaclassica.com.

Recent Posts by Mary Naples

Pithecusae: Island of Firsts

By Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Home to thermal springs and verdant landscapes, the idyllic island of Ischia also houses the first Greek settlement in all of Europe. Enterprising pioneers from the Greek island of Euboea, founded the colony in the mid-eighth century BCE, naming it Pithecusae from the Greek word pithekos meaning “ape”

The Brutality of Citizen Wives

By Mary E. Naples, M.A. Thesmophoria, the feminine fertility festival, dedicated to the Goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, was literally for women only. Citizen males of ancient Greece were unconditionally restricted from attending any portion of the three-day long event, though they were responsible for its expenses. Further, men who spied on, or interrupted,

Hypatia-The Last Academic (Part Two)

By Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Read Hypatia-The Last Academic (part One) here. Under Christian rule, Alexandria, once the definitive center of learning throughout the empire, was fast becoming anti-intellectual and inhospitable to Hypatia and the academic circle in which she traveled. In fact, this burgeoning new religion was oftentimes suspicious of learning, equating

Hypatia: The Last Academic – Part One

By Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom They came to her by land. They came to her by sea. They came to her from the farthest reaches of the Roman Empire and they came to her from close by. Amongst the literati, Hypatia (355-415 CE), acclaimed philosopher and leading mathematician, was a rock star. She

Demeter’s Daughters: Women of the Thesmophoria

By Mary E. Naples, M.A. In the indigo light of the early morning, wearing white robes and carrying torches, the pious women ascended the hill to the Thesmophorion (sanctuary to Demeter) in observance of their three day long annual festival honoring Demeter, goddess of the harvest, and her daughter Persephone. Were they chanting? Were they

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