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Tag Archives: Ancient Greece

The Healing of Athens

Written by George Theodoridis, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Once a year Athens went to the theater to heal herself.  Once the two Persian attacks were done, once the last barbarian soldier left Plataea and Mycale, once the last Persian ship was driven out of the waters of Salamis, a burgeoning epidemic of arrogance overtook Athens.

Apocryphal, Anecdotal and Sensational: What the ‘Apophthegms’ Tell Us About the Ancient World

Written by Steven Whitehead, Contributing Writer of Classical Wisdom and host of the Spartan History Podcast To the southwest of Thessaloniki, in northern Greece, lies the small town of Pydna. It was here on June the 28th, 168 BCE, that an already-crumbling Hellenic civilization began its final decline. Under the leadership of Consul Lucius Aemilius

Volcanoes in the Ancient World: Cataclysm and Change

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Volcanic eruptions have had a devastating impact on pre-industrial societies such as the ancient Greeks and Romans. Volcanoes have in fact changed history. Some of the most important eruptions in the history of the Classical world are discussed below. Theran Eruption and the End of Minoan Civilization

Aspects of Ariadne: Part 1

Written by Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In the Myth of the Minotaur, if not for the ministrations of the humble Princess Ariadne, Theseus—the Greek hero—would not have had a prayer. Although often portrayed as a mere maiden, truth be told, providing back-up for a leading man was the very least of her qualities.

Alexander of Abonoteichus: Charlatan and False Prophet

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom We think of Graeco-Roman world as a fairly rational, even secular. However, classical societies were extremely superstitious. In the ancient world, people used religion and magic to help them to cope with what, for them, could be an unpredictable and brutal world. This led to the rise

The Tragedy of Trump

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Dear Reader, Today, we come to bury Caesar, not to praise him… We have witnessed the final act of a tragedy that would be the envy of Sophocles, Aeschylus, or Euripides. As with any good tragedy, it begins with a man of middling character. A man who crossed