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Walk Like an Egyptian: Early Greek Art

It easily falls into the ‘conspiracy’ category – but that doesn’t mean it isn’t a fun story to tell. We are all taught that empires rise and fall and that every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end. Ancient Greece and Ancient Egypt were no exception. The year was 1336 BC and the Egyptian

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Aristotle’s Poetics – The Science of Tragedy

Aristotle probably would have liked Titanic. He might have even compared it to Sophocles’ Theban Plays, celebrating Jack and Rose as one might appreciate Antigone and Oedipus. We can’t be sure, of course, but in all likelihood Plato’s student would have praised the late 90’s sob story as an exemplary specimen of tragedy. Maybe that’s

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Aristotle The Philosopher who Knew it All

It has been said that he was a man who knew everything. In fact, he was considered the last man who did know everything. Was he born with a supernatural Rainman-like memory? Did the Gods imbue him with the divine gift of wisdom? Maybe, but probably not. In all likelihood, he did know everything of

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The Peloponnesian War – The Sicilian Expedition

The Sicilian Expedition To read the previous segment on the Peloponnesian War, Click HERE. When we left off last week, the Peloponnesian war had been raging for 16 odd years, with the latter six under a suspicious title of ‘peace’. The dominance of the Athenians had been questioned and the first set of battles ended

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The Peloponnesian War Summary of Battles and Betrayals – Part Two

To Read Part One, Click here: http://classicalwisdom.com/the-peloponnesian-war-summary-part-one/ The entirety of the Peloponnesian war is broken into two parts, punctuated by a brief, and probably very welcomed, armistice. The total engagement, with all its battles and betrayals, began in 431 BC and finally concluded with complete devestation in 404 BC. The first collection of campaigns, referred

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