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Tag Archives: Peloponnesian war

Timeline of Ancient Greek history

3000 BCE First Settlers: Hunter-gathers begin to settle in what is Greece. A bronze age culture and civilization begins on the island of Crete. 1600 BCE Mycenaean Greece: Bronze age kingdoms in mainland Greece. Powerful kings who ruled centralized states and who built great palaces such as Mycenae. 1194 BCE Trojan War: This was a

Athens First

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Recently, your editor asked a question… Is nationalism “good”? How interesting, we thought to ourselves. Immediately, hand went to chin. We furrowed our eyebrows in earnest ponderance. Some questions stay with you, dear reader. Like a sore on the roof of your mouth that would go away if

Sparta Vs. Athens

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom SPARTA Sparta, also known by its ancient name Lacedaemon in honor of their legendary founder, is often considered to have been the most dominant military presence in ancient Greece. Their infantry soldiers were said to have been among the most skilled and fearsome warriors of the ancient world.

The Peloponnesian War Summary of Battles and Betrayals: Athens’ Last Stand

The Peloponnesian War Summary of Battles and Betrayals: The Sicilian Expedition can be found HERE. The year is 413 BC and the battle between Sparta and Athens continues to rage. The war, which saw a brief 6 year peace, is now back on after Athens’ bitter defeat in Sicily. The Spartans had sent aid to

The Peloponnesian War – The Sicilian Expedition

The Sicilian Expedition To read the previous segment on the Peloponnesian War, Click HERE. When we left off last week, the Peloponnesian war had been raging for 16 odd years, with the latter six under a suspicious title of ‘peace’. The dominance of the Athenians had been questioned and the first set of battles ended

The Peloponnesian War Summary of Battles and Betrayals – Part Two

To Read Part One, Click here: https://classicalwisdom.com/the-peloponnesian-war-summary-part-one/ The entirety of the Peloponnesian war is broken into two parts, punctuated by a brief, and probably very welcomed, armistice. The total engagement, with all its battles and betrayals, began in 431 BC and finally concluded with complete devestation in 404 BC. The first collection of campaigns, referred