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Tag Archives: Antigone

The Tragedy of Trump

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Dear Reader, Today, we come to bury Caesar, not to praise him… We have witnessed the final act of a tragedy that would be the envy of Sophocles, Aeschylus, or Euripides. As with any good tragedy, it begins with a man of middling character. A man who crossed

Victor Davis Hanson Interview: Is There an Ancient Cancel Culture?

  You can read the transcript below: Anya Leonard  0:08   Hello, this is Anya Leonard, founder and director of Classical Wisdom. You are listening to Classical Wisdom Speaks, a podcast dedicated to bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds. Today I’m speaking with Victor Davis Hanson, an American classicist, military historian, columnist and farmer. He is

Antigone: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom In Sophocles’ Antigone there are several different struggles taking place concerning different aspects of social, ethical, and political thought. The role of the citizen, the role of the leader, the right to rule, piety, disobedience, and other issues are discussed throughout the play. Indebted as we are

The Death of Socrates…and the State that Killed Him

According to the Oracle at Delphi, Socrates was the wisest of them all. It is usually considered unwise, however, to publicly attack the political class and humiliate their intellect, capability and righteousness. This is particularly true when the government is in a weakened and, therefore, volatile position. Why then would Socrates, nobel pillar of wisdom,

Sophocles Antigone: One Woman Against the State

by Anya Leonard “My nature is to join in love, not hate” – ‘Antigone’ in Sophocles Antigone. Maybe it’s no surprise then that this individual found herself on the wrong side of the state. The powers that be probably didn’t appreciate either, that this adversary came from the oppressed class, one of the current underdogs of

The Unlucky Seven Against Thebes

Seven warriors killing seven other soldiers in front of seven gates. You’d think that story would forever condemn the number to enmity. But Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes makes no comment on the conspicuous symmetry of the legend’s numeral element. Maybe the seven city portals warranted warriors to both attack and protect them. Unfortunately if you are seeking