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The Melian Dialogue – the Brutal Reality of Power

by Ed Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Down the centuries people have referred to the works of ancient historians to understand contemporary events. Many have studied the work of Thucydides to understand present-day international relations and politics. In particular, The Melian Dialogue provides a perennial insight into politics, power and international relations. The dialogue takes

Battle of Marathon

The battle of Marathon has, for millenia now, been firmly planted within the annals of western history. A decisive battle, a clash of cultures, the narrative describes an outnumbered Athenian army staying off the Persian invaders who would see the Greek civilization consumed within their empire. And as we gaze through the looking glass of

What Makes a Republic? The Evolution of a Political System.

By Ed Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In the contemporary world, republics are the most common form of government, yet few of us take the time to consider what a republic actually is. If we want to more deeply understand the nature of republics, we need to look back to the ancient examples of Rome,

The Healing of Athens

Written by George Theodoridis, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Once a year Athens went to the theater to heal herself.  Once the two Persian attacks were done, once the last barbarian soldier left Plataea and Mycale, once the last Persian ship was driven out of the waters of Salamis, a burgeoning epidemic of arrogance overtook Athens.

Ancient Philosophy: A Crash Course

1. Metaphysics Metaphysics is the very broad and very profound branch of ancient philosophy that attempts to makes sense of the universe around us. Metaphysics asks ‘what is the universe?’ What is it made of? How does it behave? And what about the universe makes toast always land butter side down? This was a subject

The Fragility of Democracy: Athens and the Thirty Tyrants

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Athens is traditionally seen as the birthplace of democracy. However, as we know, democracies are vulnerable to anti-democratic forces, such as populism and authoritarian movements. This was also the case with Athens. For some eight months (404-403 BC) the city was controlled by a pro-Spartan oligarchy known