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Tag Archives: Sparta

What happened to HEROES?

We barely made it out… the window in which the Argentine border was open and flights were leaving closed almost 24 hours after we safely landed in Houston Intercontinental.  Yes, dear reader, we made it to America… and just in time for the summer. And while many of you nationwide are enjoying the unofficial start

Apocryphal, Anecdotal and Sensational: What the ‘Apophthegms’ Tell Us About the Ancient World

Written by Steven Whitehead, Contributing Writer of Classical Wisdom and host of the Spartan History Podcast To the southwest of Thessaloniki, in northern Greece, lies the small town of Pydna. It was here on June the 28th, 168 BCE, that an already-crumbling Hellenic civilization began its final decline. Under the leadership of Consul Lucius Aemilius

Classical Greece: Golden Age and Time of War

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom When we think about Ancient Greece, we most likely think of the Classical Age. Starting with the first Persian invasion and ending with the rise of Macedonia, this was the period in which Athens and Sparta vied for control of Greece. It was also a time of

Lycurgus: Mysterious Spartan Lawgiver

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Sparta has fascinated people for thousands of years. One of the most, if not the most important figure in all of Spartan history was Lycurgus, the great lawgiver. The interesting thing is that we know very little about this man and his character and indeed, many suspect

Sparta: The Warrior State?

Written by Meghan McKenna, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Sparta, home of Ancient Greece’s most brutal warriors, trained from their youths to become capable hoplites. It is an image that has become a staple of our thoughts when thinking about how Spartan society may have been. But is this the case or is this a force-fed

The Fragility of Democracy: Athens and the Thirty Tyrants

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Athens is traditionally seen as the birthplace of democracy. However, as we know, democracies are vulnerable to anti-democratic forces, such as populism and authoritarian movements. This was also the case with Athens. For some eight months (404-403 BC) the city was controlled by a pro-Spartan oligarchy known