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Tag Archives: Greek Tragedy

Alcestis: The Least Tragic Tragedy

by Sean Kelly, Managing Editor, Classical Wisdom What do you think of when hear the words “Greek tragedy”? I’ll bet that the images that spring to mind tend to be dark and dramatic. Yet not all tragedies fit this preconception. Not all tragedies are quite so…. Tragic. For instance, there were the Satyr plays. In

Euripides’ Helen – an Alternative View of Helen of Troy

by Sean Kelly, Managing Editor, Classical Wisdom She’s probably the single most famous woman from all of Greek mythology. We think we know the tale – the most beautiful woman in the world, and the enormous war that was fought over her. Yet her story is much more complex than many may imagine. Was she

The Differences Between Roman and Greek Tragedy

by Lydia Serrant, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom There is no doubt that the Romans drew a lot from the Greeks. This included their love of theatre. Roman theatre took a while to take hold, but once it did, it was popularised across the Empire and evolved over the centuries. The Romans adopted many of the

The Tragedy of Trump

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Dear Reader, Today, we come to bury Caesar, not to praise him… We have witnessed the final act of a tragedy that would be the envy of Sophocles, Aeschylus, or Euripides. As with any good tragedy, it begins with a man of middling character. A man who crossed

Aeschylus Speaks To Me

Written By Walter Borden, M.D., Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Aeschylus speaks to me. Born in Eleusis, a village just north of Athens and the haunting grounds of the goddess Demeter, said to be the goddess of fertility and the harvest. To Aeschylus that was just a myth that masked her true identity—the goddess of grief.

Antigone: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom In Sophocles’ Antigone there are several different struggles taking place concerning different aspects of social, ethical, and political thought. The role of the citizen, the role of the leader, the right to rule, piety, disobedience, and other issues are discussed throughout the play. Indebted as we are