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Tag Archives: Odysseus

How do you handle SLANDER?

In the ancient Greek world, they cared about what others thought of them… really cared. In fact, there was a term for it: Kleos. Kleos is often translated to “renown”, or “glory”, but this interpretation misrepresents this essential and insightful term. Kleos is actually related to the word “to hear” and carries the implied meaning

What is Evil? Why are we so interested in it?

It’s hard to anticipate, to accept. The idea that you could actually know someone evil. That happens to other people, right? But there I was, staring at the photo in the newspaper of my former classmate, clad in the orange prison jumpsuit in front of the judge. The headline described the whole lurid affair: Eighth

Aeolus: Keeper of the Winds

Written by Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In Greek mythology the name Aeolus pops up in reference to three different characters: Aeolus, the son of Hippotes, and keeper of the winds; Aeolus, the half-human son of Poseidon; and Aeolus, the son of Hellen (not the Helen of the Trojan War, but a mortal ruler

Polyphemus: Two faces of a Cyclops

Written by Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Polyphemus is best known as the Cyclops that Odysseus and his men encountered on their return from the Trojan War. But, is there another side to this man-eating giant? And what happened to him after Odysseus sailed away? The legend is born Polyphemus was one of the

From God of the Sea to Maserati: The Legacy of Poseidon

Poseidon, the notorious Greek god of the sea (though he was also god of earthquakes, storms, and horses) has been held in high esteem over the millennia. The Romans recast him as the god Neptune, retaining his dominion over the sea. In Bologna, Italy, during the 16th century, the Fountain of Neptune was erected, becoming

Circe: Justice for the Witch

By Kat Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom If you think you know the story of Circe, the witch of Aeaea and the seducer of the hero Odysseus, think again. There’s more to her story than is widely publicized or acknowledged, but to understand how Circe became one of ancient Greek mythology’s most notorious women you