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Tag Archives: Odysseus

Aeolus: Keeper of the Winds

Written by Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In Greek mythology the name Aeolus pops up in reference to three different characters: Aeolus, the son of Hippotes, and keeper of the winds; Aeolus, the half-human son of Poseidon; and Aeolus, the son of Hellen (not the Helen of the Trojan War, but a mortal ruler

Polyphemus: Two faces of a Cyclops

Written by Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Polyphemus is best known as the Cyclops that Odysseus and his men encountered on their return from the Trojan War. But, is there another side to this man-eating giant? And what happened to him after Odysseus sailed away? The legend is born Polyphemus was one of the

From God of the Sea to Maserati: The Legacy of Poseidon

Poseidon, the notorious Greek god of the sea (though he was also god of earthquakes, storms, and horses) has been held in high esteem over the millennia. The Romans recast him as the god Neptune, retaining his dominion over the sea. In Bologna, Italy, during the 16th century, the Fountain of Neptune was erected, becoming

Circe: Justice for the Witch

By Kat Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom If you think you know the story of Circe, the witch of Aeaea and the seducer of the hero Odysseus, think again. There’s more to her story than is widely publicized or acknowledged, but to understand how Circe became one of ancient Greek mythology’s most notorious women you

The Sirens: A Symbol of Fear

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “For with their high clear song, the Sirens bewitch him, as they sit there in a meadow piled high with the moldering skeletons of men, whose withered skin still hangs upon their bones.” Odyssey. 12: 39-54 The elusive Sirens of the Aegean have been cornerstone characters in Greek

The Bloodless – but perhaps Most Clever – Greek Tragedy Ever Written

By Ben Potter and Anya Leonard Sophocles’ Philoctetes, first performed in 409 BC, isn’t a typical tragedy, certainly not in the more modern perception of the genre. There is no high death toll and no evil, underhand conniving that leaves characters bitter and crushed. In a word, there is no blood. In fact, as far