Skip to Content

Tag Archives: Sophocles

9 Awesome Quotes from Aeschylus

Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC) was a playwright of ancient Greece and is considered the father of Tragedy. He wrote between 70 and 90 plays, won 28 competitions and completely altered the face of the stage… As well as being an important dramatist, he was a successful military man, having taken part in both

Sparta Vs. Athens

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom SPARTA Sparta, also known by its ancient name Lacedaemon in honor of their legendary founder, is often considered to have been the most dominant military presence in ancient Greece. Their infantry soldiers were said to have been among the most skilled and fearsome warriors of the ancient world.

Euripides, The Great Greek Tragedian

By Eldar Balta, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Euripides’ Early life Born on Salamis Island in 480 BC to mother Cleito and father Mnesarchus, Euripides’ destiny was foretold in a prophecy given to his father. The Oracle fated that Euripides would one day hold the “crowns of victory”. Mnesarchus did not lose any time insisting that

The Bloodless – but perhaps Most Clever – Greek Tragedy Ever Written

By Ben Potter and Anya Leonard Sophocles’ Philoctetes, first performed in 409 BC, isn’t a typical tragedy, certainly not in the more modern perception of the genre. There is no high death toll and no evil, underhand conniving that leaves characters bitter and crushed. In a word, there is no blood. In fact, as far

Sophocles Antigone: One Woman Against the State

by Anya Leonard “My nature is to join in love, not hate” – ‘Antigone’ in Sophocles Antigone. Maybe it’s no surprise then that this individual found herself on the wrong side of the state. The powers that be probably didn’t appreciate either, that this adversary came from the oppressed class, one of the current underdogs of

Oedipus at Colonus: The Tale of Two Ancient Deaths

And so it comes to be, that all men must die. Yes, even the old ones. The great poet and dramatist, Sophocles, was approaching his own end when he imagined the glorious finale of the tragic figure, Oedipus in Oedipus at Colonus. This play is thought to be Sophocles’ final one because it was first produced