Skip to Content

Tag Archives: Plato

Socrates And Martin Luther King: Lessons in Civil Disobedience

Written by Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom At the opening of the Crito, a dialogue by the philosopher Plato, Socrates has been imprisoned. He is awaiting his execution for the supposed crimes of corrupting the youth and believing in strange gods. However, it is only by chance that Socrates is still alive, trapped in his

Ethical Egoism: Getting What You Want

Written by Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom There are a few advantages we have going for us when we study moral philosophy. The first is that moral philosophy (also known as ethical philosophy) is immediately applicable to our lives. The second is that many of the suppositions seem to be rather easy to confirm.

Catharsis: Aristotle’s Defense of Poetry

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Clasical Wisdom Surely, we are all familiar with the term “catharsis.” A significant number of us have probably used it from time to time to describe an experience, such as when we leave a movie saying “That was cathartic!” Yet, how many of us know what it really means,

Democracy’s Fatal Flaw: Us

Written by William Giovinazzo, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom When I was a kid, I was taught by the good sisters of Saint Joseph that democracy is a wonderful thing, something ordained by God. In the United States in the early 1960s, it was seen as God’s gift to man, the bulwark against godless communism. Kennedy

Man: The Political Animal

Written by David Hooker, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Tragic Road to Tyranny  Imagine your leader is a brilliant and bold military genius who, through multiple conquests, has expanded the borders of your country by orders of magnitude.  He does it because he and some of your leaders have ambitions of empire, need of new

Classical Ethics

By Brendan M.P. Heard, contributing writer, Classical Wisdom Ethics: the ambitious discipline of determining nothing less than what is good and what is bad, or the analysis and administration of the obligation of moral duty. One might say it is the judicial branch of philosophy, or the point at which the philosopher, after establishing whether