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Tag Archives: Plato

Xenophon: A Biography of the Historian, Poet and Military Strategist

By Eldar Balta, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Xenophon’s Early life Not much is known of Xenophon from his early years, except that he was son of Gryllus, a wealthy citizen of Erchia, a suburb of Athens. He was born circa 430 BC, and not much is known of his life up to 401 BC. This

Socrates and Euthyphro: The Nature Of Piety

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom As a general disclaimer, it is important to remember that “Euthyphro” was written by the philosopher Plato. While Socrates is used as a character in this dialogue, it is unknown if Socrates himself would have held such ideas. Although it is very possible that many of these thoughts

Plato’s “Apology” And The Wisdom Of Socrates

“The Apology” recounts the speech Socrates delivers to the court of Athens that means to put him to death for his odd practices. He is charged with “corrupting the youth and believing in strange gods” a crime that was punishable by death in ancient Athens. Socrates would have had some choice words for the man

Of Ancient Bondage

By Ben Potter “Jove takes half the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him”. Homer was quick to recognize the terror and inhumanity of slavery. And he used it as a powerful tool to stoke the drama of his epic: “tears will break forth anew for he who would have

The Times of Tyranny

By Ben Potter The lead-up to the Second World War was often referred to (in its own time) as the Age of the Great Dictators. The idea being that, even though the fledgling American experiment was going rather well, not all democracies were pulling their weight in the war of ideologies. Emerging dictatorial talents in

The Pitiable Tyrant

Do you remember a few weeks ago when we had a bit of a discussion on the Platonic dialogue, Gorgias? I sure do. Those were good times, simpler times. Most of you are dedicated readers so I won’t have to remind you that we discussed the nature of rhetoric, the morality of rhetoric, and Socrates’