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Tag Archives: Virgil

Four Common(ly misunderstood) Latin Proverbs

The other day a student told me that, during her studies as an art student, she had to sculpt a small statue as an assignment for one of her courses. She did so without having put much thought into it. The professor approached her and started praising her work, giving it much more and much

Why Study Latin? The Reason for Dead Languages

By Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “Why study dead languages?” “Who needs that?” “Why don’t you learn something that you can actually communicate in?” These are the questions that every person who has studied ancient languages has been asked at least once…or a hundred times. As someone that has practiced and taught Latin for

The Passion of Dido

By Mary E. Naples Commissioned by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus after his decisive victory at Actium over Antony and Cleopatra, Virgil’s Aeneid is a patrilineal tale tracing the pedigree of the Italic people from the mythical, stalwart Trojan heroes. A glory to the Trojans and the Romans alike. Indeed, both the Trojan

The Quietest, Coolest, Most Pleasant Place in the World

By Anya Leonard “We passed along the coastline of Epirus To port Chaonia, where we put in, Below Buthrotum on the height… I saw before me Troy in miniature A slender copy of our massive tower, A dry brooklet named Xanthus…and I pressed My body against a Scaean Gate. Those with me Feasted their eyes

Virgil (70 BCE- 21 BCE)

Virgil or Publius Vergilius Maro, his full name, is one of the most celebrated and influential of the ancient Roman poets. His work was loved during his lifetime and has survived through the ages. It is believed that he authored several small poems during his life. However he is often remembered for three books in particular.