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Tag Archives: Virgil

Is it Good to Know You Know Nothing?

It’s called the Imposter Syndrome and it’s usually touted about by life coaches to reassure the doubtful. For those who are prone to question their abilities, to feel as if they are actually an imposter rather than the expert they are portrayed as, this label can assuage their fears.  You are fully capable, they confirm,

Hunting Dogs in the Ancient World

Written by Robert Gate, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom For millennia, dogs and people have shared a close partnership. No one is still ready to claim when and where the first dog was domesticated, but it is generally accepted that it was for hunting. Thousands of years ago, men did not have big guns to aid

Not Your Virgil’s Sinon: The Greeks and the Man Who Tricked the Trojans

Written by Cynthia C. Polsley, Ph.D., Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom And I said to him: ‘Who are those two poor sinners who give off smoke like wet hands in the winter and lie so close to you upon the right?’ ‘I found them here,’ he answered, ‘when I rained down to this rocky slope; they’ve not

Four Common(ly misunderstood) Latin Proverbs

The other day a student told me that, during her studies as an art student, she had to sculpt a small statue as an assignment for one of her courses. She did so without having put much thought into it. The professor approached her and started praising her work, giving it much more and much

Why Study Latin? The Reason for Dead Languages

By Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “Why study dead languages?” “Who needs that?” “Why don’t you learn something that you can actually communicate in?” These are the questions that every person who has studied ancient languages has been asked at least once…or a hundred times. As someone that has practiced and taught Latin for

The Passion of Dido

By Mary E. Naples Commissioned by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus after his decisive victory at Actium over Antony and Cleopatra, Virgil’s Aeneid is a patrilineal tale tracing the pedigree of the Italic people from the mythical, stalwart Trojan heroes. A glory to the Trojans and the Romans alike. Indeed, both the Trojan