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Tag Archives: Cicero

Book Review: “How to Tell a Joke,” By Michael Fontaine

Written by Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom As Michael Fontaine’s latest book How to Tell a Joke: An Ancient Guide to the Art of Humor comes hot on the heels of his fascinating How to Drink: A Classical Guide to the Art of Imbibing, one might reasonably expect the Cornell professor’s next installment to

Concerning Hobbits, Philosophers, and Magic Rings: Classical Wisdom in Middle Earth

Written by Justin D. Lyons, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom “It seemed that the ring he had was a magic ring: it made you invisible! He had heard of such things, of course, in old, old tales; but it was hard to believe that he had really found one by accident.” The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Cicero: Defender of Freedom, Orator, and Philosopher

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Cicero (106-43 BC) is perhaps one of the most remarkable figures in the history of Rome. He was an important politician and statesman who attempted to defend the Republic. Cicero was also a great philosopher and writer whose works greatly influenced the development of Roman oratory and

Book Review: “How to Tell a Joke,” By Michael Fontaine

Written by Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom As Michael Fontaine’s latest book How to Tell a Joke: An Ancient Guide to the Art of Humor comes hot on the heels of his fascinating How to Drink: A Classical Guide to the Art of Imbibing, one might reasonably expect the Cornell professor’s next installment to

Corruption in the Classical World

Written by Ronan McLaverty-Head, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The barbs traded between Demosthenes and Aeschines in 4th century BC Athens would not be out of place on cable news today. After their attempt to draw up a treaty between Athens and Philip of Macedon, Demosthenes and Aeschines fell out spectacularly. Demosthenes accused Aeschines of corruption of