Marcus Aurelius | Classical Wisdom Weekly

Skip to Content

Tag Archives: Marcus Aurelius

The False Promise of Stoicism

Written by Aaron Smith, Instructor and Fellow, Ayn Rand Institute [The Ayn Rand Institute has granted permission to Classical Wisdom Weekly to republish this article in its entirety, originally published in New Ideal, but does not necessarily endorse the images accompanying it or other content on this site.] Over the past decade, the ancient Greek

What should our relationship be with animals?

It seemed an unlikely spot to bring up a philosophical question of such importance. This was essentially the set of Tiger King, after all. The ring, the cage and the unnatural animal combinations with clever portmanteaus, like Liger and Tigon, gave the impression of one of those side circuses of a bygone era.   We were

Alexander of Abonoteichus: Charlatan and False Prophet

Written by Ed Whalen, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom We think of Graeco-Roman world as a fairly rational, even secular. However, classical societies were extremely superstitious. In the ancient world, people used religion and magic to help them to cope with what, for them, could be an unpredictable and brutal world. This led to the rise

How to Eat Like a Stoic: The Ancient Diets of Cynicism and Stoicism

Donald J. Robertson, Writer and Cognitive-behavioural Psychotherapist, author of “The Philosophy of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy” The ancient Cynic and Stoic philosophers were very interested in food. (At the end of this article you’ll even find a modern recipe for Stoic soup.) They talk both about what we should eat and how we should eat it, if we want to live wisely

Meditations on the Rise of Stoicism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom Stoicism, as a philosophy of life, has become increasingly popular amongst the general public. With practical lessons on how to control our temper, how to have good friendships, prioritizing what’s important, facing death, avoiding the pitfalls of consumer culture, and how to live the good life, it

How do you handle SLANDER?

In the ancient Greek world, they cared about what others thought of them… really cared. In fact, there was a term for it: Kleos. Kleos is often translated to “renown”, or “glory”, but this interpretation misrepresents this essential and insightful term. Kleos is actually related to the word “to hear” and carries the implied meaning