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Tag Archives: Ancient Rome

Tarquin, Last King of Rome and Bloody Tyrant

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Roman Republic was moulded rather decisively by the fall of the monarchy. The Republic was designed to prevent the re-emergence of rule by a single person. Rome’s last monarch was Lucius Tarquinius Superbus (died 495 BC). His tyranny provoked a rebellion, and this was to lead

How the Ancient Romans Used to Eat: Everything You Need to Know

Written by Jason Dunlap, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Everyone likes to eat out at a nice restaurant. Indeed, modern fancymeals are considered a classic way to enjoy a special night. Have you ever wondered what the people of ancient civilizations used to eat? What was considered lavish and luxury dining in ancient Rome? Well then,

What if Carthage had won the Punic Wars?

Written by Lydia Serrant, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ancient Rome was unquestionably the major influencer of European culture that still resonates to this day. If you are a European, living in Europe, or from a country that is highly influenced by European culture like America, then you would be hard-pressed to go a day without

Romulus and Remus: Murder and the Foundation of Rome

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The ancient Romans were so respectful of tradition and ancient practices that they revered the founder of Rome, Romulus, even though he murdered his brother Remus. In fact, the myth of Romulus and Remus was crucial to the construction of Roman identity and important in the development

The Classical Wisdom of the Founding Fathers

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom The United States of America will turn 244 years old tomorrow. From a historical perspective, the U.S. is quite a young nation. We’ve come a long way, and have much still to learn. To those of you not already aware, it may come as no surprise to

The tainted glory of the gladiator

By Ben Potter The sun rises high over Rome’s Amphitheatrum Flavium, the mightiest arena in the world. Only the colossal statue of Nero, which one-day will lend the stadium its eternal pseudonym, dwarfs it. The 50,000 strong crowd of men and women, young and old, rich and poor, are tightly coiled; one giant organism ready