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Tag Archives: Augustus

The Birth of the Biography

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom What springs to mind when we think about literature of the Ancient World? Maybe it’s Homer’s Achilles dragging the corpse of Hector around Troy or Sophocles’ Oedipus stabbing out his polluted eyes. Perhaps it’s Plato’s Socrates holding forth or Herodotus’ Leonidas and his 300 Spartans. It even might

Do All Roads ACTUALLY Lead to Rome?

We all know the phrase “All roads lead to Rome”. Today, it is used proverbially and has come to mean something like “there is more than one way to reach the same goal”. But did all roads ever really lead to the eternal city? The Power of Pavement There was a close connection between roads

The Passion of Dido

By Mary E. Naples Commissioned by none other than Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus after his decisive victory at Actium over Antony and Cleopatra, Virgil’s Aeneid is a patrilineal tale tracing the pedigree of the Italic people from the mythical, stalwart Trojan heroes. A glory to the Trojans and the Romans alike. Indeed, both the Trojan

The Quietest, Coolest, Most Pleasant Place in the World

By Anya Leonard “We passed along the coastline of Epirus To port Chaonia, where we put in, Below Buthrotum on the height… I saw before me Troy in miniature A slender copy of our massive tower, A dry brooklet named Xanthus…and I pressed My body against a Scaean Gate. Those with me Feasted their eyes

Ovid (43 BCE- AD 17)

Ovid, know during his life as Publius Ovidius Naso, was a noted Roman poet who is often mentioned along with the likes of Virgil and Horace. He lived during a significant time of Roman politics and briefly tried his hand at public office while traveling across much of the early Roman empire including Athens and Asia minor.