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Tag Archives: Athenian Democracy

A Day in the Life of an Ancient Athenian

Written by Lydia Serrant, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Athens, 424 BCE It is daybreak on a Tuesday, and already the day is beginning to warm. As usual, you wake up at sunrise to the sound of ritual singing coming from the courtyard. Your household slave has risen early and sings to the dawn as she prepares

Solon: Great Lawmaker and First Democrat

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Solon (640-560 BC) was one of the most important men in the Classical world. He was in part responsible for setting Athens on its road to greatness. He helped to stabilize the city-state and laid the foundations for the future Athenian Empire. Most importantly of all, he

#CancelCulture: Lessons from the Ancient World (PART 2)

Written by Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Classical Wisdom for Modern Minds You remember our mandate. Here we believe classical wisdom can ring true for modern minds. The great minds of classical antiquity still have much to teach us. You need only show up to class. And if you’d like to know how this

Aeschylus Speaks To Me

Written By Walter Borden, M.D., Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Aeschylus speaks to me. Born in Eleusis, a village just north of Athens and the haunting grounds of the goddess Demeter, said to be the goddess of fertility and the harvest. To Aeschylus that was just a myth that masked her true identity—the goddess of grief.

Antigone: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom In Sophocles’ Antigone there are several different struggles taking place concerning different aspects of social, ethical, and political thought. The role of the citizen, the role of the leader, the right to rule, piety, disobedience, and other issues are discussed throughout the play. Indebted as we are

Democracy’s Fatal Flaw: Us

Written by William Giovinazzo, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom When I was a kid, I was taught by the good sisters of Saint Joseph that democracy is a wonderful thing, something ordained by God. In the United States in the early 1960s, it was seen as God’s gift to man, the bulwark against godless communism. Kennedy