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Tag Archives: Ancient greek

The Education System In Ancient Greece

Written by Katherine Rundell, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In the disciplines of math and philosophy it is broadly accepted that we have the ancient Greeks to thank for them. From Aristotle to Pythagoras, these towering figures spent countless hours considering the deepest problems of their age, often coming up with new paradigms for them. Metaphysics,

Wine as pharmakon: Persian drinking in the Histories

Written by Ronan McLaverty-Head, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Herodotus tells us that the Persians were “very partial to wine,” something he illustrates with the following anecdote: “If an important decision is to be made, they [the Persians] discuss the question when they are drunk, and the following day the master of the house where the

Healthy Skepticism for Better Debates

By Jacob Bell, Associate Editor, Classical Wisdom One would have thought that in this age of information, logical fallacies would cease to exist. But, amazingly, the exact opposite has happened despite our incredible access to information. After all, we can open up an internet browser and within a few minutes we have thousands of pages

[Video] Classics Challenge: Ancient Greek Memorization Techniques

In ancient Greece, prior to being written down, stories were recounted orally. Due to that, memory played an important part in the life of an ancient Greek storyteller. The Odyssey for instance, had 12,110 lines – and each one of those had to be recited by memory – a seemingly impossible task today. Did the

Armillary Spheres: Following Celestial Objects in the Ancient World

By Ḏḥwty, Contributing Writer, Ancient Origins Astronomy is often considered to be one of the oldest branches of science. In many ancient societies, astronomical observations were used not only for the practical job of determine the rhythm of life, (e.g. the various seasons of the year, the celebration of festivals, etc.) but also for the

The Unlucky Seven Against Thebes

Seven warriors killing seven other soldiers in front of seven gates. You’d think that story would forever condemn the number to enmity. But Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes makes no comment on the conspicuous symmetry of the legend’s numeral element. Maybe the seven city portals warranted warriors to both attack and protect them. Unfortunately if you are seeking