Skip to Content

Tag Archives: tyranny

Antigone: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom In Sophocles’ Antigone there are several different struggles taking place concerning different aspects of social, ethical, and political thought. The role of the citizen, the role of the leader, the right to rule, piety, disobedience, and other issues are discussed throughout the play. Indebted as we are

The Fragility of Democracy: Athens and the Thirty Tyrants

Written by Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Athens is traditionally seen as the birthplace of democracy. However, as we know, democracies are vulnerable to anti-democratic forces, such as populism and authoritarian movements. This was also the case with Athens. For some eight months (404-403 BC) the city was controlled by a pro-Spartan oligarchy known

Man: The Political Animal

Written by David Hooker, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Tragic Road to Tyranny  Imagine your leader is a brilliant and bold military genius who, through multiple conquests, has expanded the borders of your country by orders of magnitude.  He does it because he and some of your leaders have ambitions of empire, need of new

The Times of Tyranny

By Ben Potter The lead-up to the Second World War was often referred to (in its own time) as the Age of the Great Dictators. The idea being that, even though the fledgling American experiment was going rather well, not all democracies were pulling their weight in the war of ideologies. Emerging dictatorial talents in

The Ages of Ancient Greece

By Ben Potter Archaic. Classical. Hellenistic. These terms are often (and quite naturally) conflated together under the generic heading of ‘classical’, or, at the very least, ‘old’. It appears that organizing history into clear, distinct eras can be a tricky business. This, of course, is more true for the Greeks than for the Romans. This