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Tag Archives: Nicomachean Ethics

Valentine’s Day Advice from Aristotle: Love Yourself

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom What does it mean to love yourself—to practice self-love (Philautia)? It’s not uncommon to see self-love being lumped in with selfishness: we see someone who is greedy, who only cares for his own advantage, often at the expense of those close to him, and we say, “He

Classical Ethics – Part Two

By Brendan M.P. Heard, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Read Classical Ethics – Part One Here The maxim, know thyself, inscribed over the opening to the very ancient Temple of Apollo at Delphi, was a traditional credo of much speculation. This call to know thyself is inextricably tied to Socrates’ belief that “the unexamined life is

Classical Ethics

By Brendan M.P. Heard, contributing writer, Classical Wisdom Ethics: the ambitious discipline of determining nothing less than what is good and what is bad, or the analysis and administration of the obligation of moral duty. One might say it is the judicial branch of philosophy, or the point at which the philosopher, after establishing whether

Aristotle: In Praise of Contemplation

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom What is the best, the highest, the happiest kind of life for human beings? Does it consist of sensual pleasure, the attainment of money, or finding a meaningful job? This is just one of the many questions that the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle concerned himself with. What was his

The Goal of Happiness: A summary of Nicomachean Ethics

The achievement of happiness, according to Aristotle, is the end goal of every man. His reasoning is thus: All human activities are done in order to attain something that is good. We don’t do something because we think it will be bad for us. In addition, most of these activities are not the main objective,

Happiness Is…

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom While the works of Aristotle are numerous, detailed, and profound in their own ways, it is arguable that the philosopher’s most notable contributions are in the realm of Ethics. It was once believed that all you really needed to know about Western philosophy could be found within the