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Tag Archives: Ancient greek tragedy

Aeschylus Speaks To Me

Written By Walter Borden, M.D., Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Aeschylus speaks to me. Born in Eleusis, a village just north of Athens and the haunting grounds of the goddess Demeter, said to be the goddess of fertility and the harvest. To Aeschylus that was just a myth that masked her true identity—the goddess of grief.

Antigone: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism

Written by Alex Barrientos, Senior Editor, Classical Wisdom In Sophocles’ Antigone there are several different struggles taking place concerning different aspects of social, ethical, and political thought. The role of the citizen, the role of the leader, the right to rule, piety, disobedience, and other issues are discussed throughout the play. Indebted as we are

Catharsis: Aristotle’s Defense of Poetry

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Clasical Wisdom Surely, we are all familiar with the term “catharsis.” A significant number of us have probably used it from time to time to describe an experience, such as when we leave a movie saying “That was cathartic!” Yet, how many of us know what it really means,

Euripides Greek Tragedy’s Unsung Hero

A lone figure, swaddled in rags sits secluded in a dank cave bent over his papyrus. The whittled reed in his hand dips rhythmically into the pot of octopus ink before adding a couple of urgent scratches to the thick page. His bushy, white beard is stained off-centre at the lower-lip, evidence of his habitual

Oedipus Rex Moral or Murder?

He is one of the most tragic heroes ever found in literature; a man so unfortunate in the eyes of the gods, that he eventually blinded himself. He forces the question of fate, of self determination, of questioning society and divinity itself. Some may say this was his fatal flaw, his resistance to the life