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Tag Archives: Tragedy

The Tragedy of Trump

By Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Dear Reader, Today, we come to bury Caesar, not to praise him… We have witnessed the final act of a tragedy that would be the envy of Sophocles, Aeschylus, or Euripides. As with any good tragedy, it begins with a man of middling character. A man who crossed

Victor Davis Hanson Interview: Is There an Ancient Cancel Culture?

  You can read the transcript below: Anya Leonard  0:08   Hello, this is Anya Leonard, founder and director of Classical Wisdom. You are listening to Classical Wisdom Speaks, a podcast dedicated to bringing ancient wisdom to modern minds. Today I’m speaking with Victor Davis Hanson, an American classicist, military historian, columnist and farmer. He is

Aeschylus Speaks To Me

Written By Walter Borden, M.D., Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Aeschylus speaks to me. Born in Eleusis, a village just north of Athens and the haunting grounds of the goddess Demeter, said to be the goddess of fertility and the harvest. To Aeschylus that was just a myth that masked her true identity—the goddess of grief.

Catharsis: Aristotle’s Defense of Poetry

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Clasical Wisdom Surely, we are all familiar with the term “catharsis.” A significant number of us have probably used it from time to time to describe an experience, such as when we leave a movie saying “That was cathartic!” Yet, how many of us know what it really means,

Agamemnon and The Cursed House of Atreus

Agamemnon, was the first of a trilogy of plays (the Oresteia), performed back to back during the Great Dionysia of 458BC; it focused on two generations of ‘The Cursed House of Atreus’. Regular readers will be well-aware of the bad blood flowing through, and often out of, the members of this unfortunate dynasty. Tantalus (grandfather

The Bloodless – but perhaps Most Clever – Greek Tragedy Ever Written

By Ben Potter and Anya Leonard Sophocles’ Philoctetes, first performed in 409 BC, isn’t a typical tragedy, certainly not in the more modern perception of the genre. There is no high death toll and no evil, underhand conniving that leaves characters bitter and crushed. In a word, there is no blood. In fact, as far