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Tag Archives: Aristophanes

The 6 Ancient Greek and Roman Classics Everyone Should Read

Written by Nicole Garrison, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Hellenes and Romans sure knew how to create and appreciate exceptional literature. So for all of you who are contemplating whether you should add some classics to your reading list, trust me, you should! In the times of the ancient Greeks and the Roman Empire, literature

Aristophanes: Utopia and Human Nature

Written by Visnja Bojovic, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ever since there were people and places, there has been a desire for other, different people, and ideal, perfect places. This concept is called utopia, a word that has its origin in ancient Greek, as a compound of the word οὐ (ou, ”not”) and τόπος (topos, ”place”).

Aristophanes’ The Frogs: A Way to Stop a War?

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom The Frogs, an ‘old’ comedy play by Aristophanes, was performed in 405 BCE at the Lenaia festival of Dionysus. With the Peloponnesian War raging on, plays of the time had a tendency to deal with saving the state, matters of right and wrong, and background events of the

Euripides, The Great Greek Tragedian

By Eldar Balta, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Euripides’ Early life Born on Salamis Island in 480 BC to mother Cleito and father Mnesarchus, Euripides’ destiny was foretold in a prophecy given to his father. The Oracle fated that Euripides would one day hold the “crowns of victory”. Mnesarchus did not lose any time insisting that

Was Ancient Greek Theater Only for Men?

by Ben Potter A quick search of our homepage will reveal that a copious amount of ink has already been spilt discussing the life and works of the great practitioners of Athenian theatre: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. However, leaving aside these individuals for the moment, brilliant as they may have been, what of the

The Ages of Ancient Greece

By Ben Potter Archaic. Classical. Hellenistic. These terms are often (and quite naturally) conflated together under the generic heading of ‘classical’, or, at the very least, ‘old’. It appears that organizing history into clear, distinct eras can be a tricky business. This, of course, is more true for the Greeks than for the Romans. This