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Tag Archives: Ovid

#CancelCulture: Lessons from the Ancient World

Written by Van Bryan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Sometimes, late at night when we can hear the ocean outside our window, we wonder what the ancients would think of us… Would they be proud? Amused? Perplexed? Surely, we imagine, we won’t repeat ALL the mistakes of our classical forebearers. Somebody must have read Aristotle, Cicero,

The Exile of Ovid: Tragedy of a Great Poet

By Edward Whelan, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Ovid (43 BC-17/18 AD) is one of the great poets of Rome and indeed of the classical world. He is still studied and read to this day and his works, especially the Metamorphoses has consistently maintained its popularity. While he is remembered as a poet of love and

Ovid’s Metamorphoses: How Love Transforms

Written by Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom If there is one literary work that has inspired a legacy of artists, poets, and creators, it’s Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Comprising 250 myths and over nearly 1200 lines of poetry, it makes up an impressive 15 books of life-defining narration. Ovid’s work doesn’t just offer a creation myth,

Polyphemus: Two faces of a Cyclops

Written by Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Polyphemus is best known as the Cyclops that Odysseus and his men encountered on their return from the Trojan War. But, is there another side to this man-eating giant? And what happened to him after Odysseus sailed away? The legend is born Polyphemus was one of the

The Passion of Christ-ian Poetry

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It is difficult to know definitively when the ‘Ancient World’ came to an end. In all likelihood, the demise of Rome and the beginning of the Dark Ages was far more a transition than any single event. But even if we’re on flimsy ground regarding the moment of

How the Spider Came to Be

Or, The Girl Who Told the Truth about the Gods By Nicole Saldarriaga, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom I’d take a look at the humble spider. Though spiders may not qualify as the most terrifying of creatures, their inclusion in a popular myth about Roman goddess, Minerva, certainly clues us into what the Greeks and Romans