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Tag Archives: Greek Mythology

The Athenian Athena

By Ben Potter, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Anyone with an interest in the classical Greek world may well have been intrigued, possibly confused, by the relationship between the goddess Athena and the ancient centre of democracy, philosophy and theatre, Athens. As Walter Burkett said in his excellent book, Greek Religion: “whether the goddess is named

14 Jokes for Mythology Lovers

Think you know your Greek Mythology? From Creatures to Titans, check your knowledge and see if you Get all these jokes for mythology lovers: 1. This serious amount of mythological cuteness: 2. Someone is a clever clogs: 3. A Gamer’s Interpretation: 4. This succinct synopsis: 5. Obviously this is a theme: 6. Someone really knows

Hippolytus: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It sounds like something straight out of a modern –albeit extremely tragic- weekday soap opera: step-son (Hippolytus) incurs the wrath of someone higher up (Aphrodite) because he fails to honor the cultural customs associated with her; scorned woman (Aphrodite) initiates plan of revenge on step-son by having step

The Smelliest Women of Ancient Greece

We all know Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, made sure that she was worshipped by punishing those who ignored her altars. One brief appearance of this wrath in the tale of Jason and the Argonauts turned into a particularly fragrant episode. The Ladies of Lemnos Jason and company were sailing on the Argo

The Dangerous Danaids

By Carly Silver, Contributing Writer, Ancient Origins The ancient Greeks had no problem painting their mythological women as murderesses. Among the most lethal ladies were the Danaids, the fifty daughters of a king whose crimes condemned them to Sisyphean fates in the Underworld. But what was so bad about them that the Roman poet Horace

Who is Hesiod?

By Ben Potter Regular readers will recall our discussion on the dubious and debated identification of Homer i.e. was he one man or two? Was he a woman? Was he a school of poets and compilers? Homer’s contemporary, the Boeotian Hesiod, if anything, is even more troublesome in this respect. Like with Homer, two poems