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Tag Archives: Theseus

Aspects of Ariadne: Part 3

Written by Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Make no mistake, unlike her previous manifestation in the Minoan pantheon (see: Part 1 and Part 2), Ariadne is now merely the wife of a fertility god. Myths abound about Dionysus’ exploits and adventures without Ariadne, yet when Ariadne is mentioned at all in these myths, it is

Aspects of Ariadne: Part 2

Written by Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In Jason and the Argonauts, Medea—another goddess-cum-princess from a foreign land (Colchis, present-day Georgia)—also acts against her better interests by abandoning her royal family for the Greek hero, Jason, who ultimately deserts her. To seize the Golden Fleece, Medea helps Jason every step of the way, even

Aspects of Ariadne: Part 1

Written by Mary Naples, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In the Myth of the Minotaur, if not for the ministrations of the humble Princess Ariadne, Theseus—the Greek hero—would not have had a prayer. Although often portrayed as a mere maiden, truth be told, providing back-up for a leading man was the very least of her qualities.

Hippolytus: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom It sounds like something straight out of a modern –albeit extremely tragic- weekday soap opera: step-son (Hippolytus) incurs the wrath of someone higher up (Aphrodite) because he fails to honor the cultural customs associated with her; scorned woman (Aphrodite) initiates plan of revenge on step-son by having step

Oedipus at Colonus: The Tale of Two Ancient Deaths

And so it comes to be, that all men must die. Yes, even the old ones. The great poet and dramatist, Sophocles, was approaching his own end when he imagined the glorious finale of the tragic figure, Oedipus in Oedipus at Colonus. This play is thought to be Sophocles’ final one because it was first produced

The Myth of Daedalus and Icarus

The story of Daedalus and Icarus is a popular myth that recounts the escape from Crete by the crafty inventor Daedalus and his son Icarus. It is a story that is often attributed to the Roman poet Ovid in his magnum opus Metamorphoses. The general theme of the story involves the ingenuity and brilliance of man, and the misuse of