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Tag Archives: Athens

Oedipus at Colonus: The Tale of Two Ancient Deaths

And so it comes to be, that all men must die. Yes, even the old ones. The great poet and dramatist, Sophocles, was approaching his own end when he imagined the glorious finale of the tragic figure, Oedipus in Oedipus at Colonus. This play is thought to be Sophocles’ final one because it was first produced

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The Rise and Fall of the Athenian Empire (part 1)

  Those of you who are members of the Classical Wisdom Society know that this month we have been looking at Herodotus’ The Histories and the epic struggle for supremacy that was the Greco-Persian wars. And that certainly is a topic worth discussing. It has been argued that had the Greeks been unable to stay

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The Ages of Ancient Greece

By Ben Potter Archaic. Classical. Hellenistic. These terms are often (and quite naturally) conflated together under the generic heading of ‘classical’, or, at the very least, ‘old’. It appears that organizing history into clear, distinct eras can be a tricky business. This, of course, is more true for the Greeks than for the Romans. This

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Ancient Philosophy: A Crash Course

1. Metaphysics Metaphysics is the very broad and very profound branch of ancient philosophy that attempts to makes sense of the universe around us. Metaphysics asks ‘what is the universe?’ What is it made of? How does it behave? And what about the universe makes toast always land butter side down? This was a subject

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Aristippus and the Pursuit of Pleasure

As is common with many of the more obscure ancient philosophers, the majority of our knowledge comes from Diogenes Laertius’ Lives of Eminent Philosophers. As always, we may be hesitant to believe everything we read in this text. Diogenes Laertius would have have lived some 500 years after the golden age of philosophy in Greece.

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My Women Fight Like Men

Queen Artemisia of Caria is mentioned by a handful of ancient Greek writers who would have lived some years after her death. Most of our knowledge about her, of course, comes from the Father of History himself. Herodotus directly makes reference to Artemisia numerous times as he recounts the events of the Greco-Persian wars. As

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