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Tag Archives: Xerxes

Xerxes: King of Kings

By Katherine Kennedy, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom In an age of heroes and gods, when priests in lofty temples decided people’s fates, there ruled a king who challenged the might of both the Egyptian and Greek empires. The grandson of Cyrus the Great, Xerxes became King, son of Queen Atossa and King Darius I, but

Timeline of Ancient Greek history

3000 BCE First Settlers: Hunter-gathers begin to settle in what is Greece. A bronze age culture and civilization begins on the island of Crete. 1600 BCE Mycenaean Greece: Bronze age kingdoms in mainland Greece. Powerful kings who ruled centralized states and who built great palaces such as Mycenae. 1194 BCE Trojan War: This was a

The History of Thebes

By Jocelyn Hitchcock, Contributing Writer, Classical Wisdom Having been inhabited for roughly 5,000 years, Thebes possesses a wealth of history and culture. Thebes is located in central Greece and garnered military might and political power, not least of which resulted from their leadership in the Boeotian League and the Sacred Band of soldiers in the

The Warring Writer: Aeschylus Tragedy

Let’s say you are considered the “father of tragedy”. Even in your own lifetime, everyone knows you have revolutionized drama and changed the theatre game. Do you think it would be mentioned on your tomb? Surely a throw away reference at least? But no, not for Aeschylus. The man who wrote between 70 and 90

Political Scandals Of Ancient Greece

1. Artemisia of Caria destroys one of her own ships Artemisia, portrayed a tad bit incorrectly by Eva Green in the recent 300 film, was a queen and military commander from the Ionian Kingdom of Caria. An ally to the massive Persian Empire of the early 5th century, Artemisia was a trusted advisor to King

My Women Fight Like Men

Queen Artemisia of Caria is mentioned by a handful of ancient Greek writers who would have lived some years after her death. Most of our knowledge about her, of course, comes from the Father of History himself. Herodotus directly makes reference to Artemisia numerous times as he recounts the events of the Greco-Persian wars. As